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October 2011 Newsletter

Indigo Street Pottery Newsletter

Welcome to our monthly newsletter! It is part of our website indigostreetpottery.com , which you can browse from this page if you click on the subjects in the header. We write here about our studio, arts events, projects, studios of our friends, garden musings, and whatever else strikes our fancy. Hope you enjoy it!



August 13, 2011: 2011 Annual Art Auction, Anderson Ranch Art Center, Snowmass, Colorado www.andersonranch.org


May of 2012: Jeff Reich and Farraday Newsome, 2-person exhibition, Plinth Gallery, Denver, Colorado http://plinthgallery.com/

1                          Indigo Street Pottery Calendar

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Indigo Street PotteryHome.html
StudioStudio.html
Farraday NewsomeFarraday_Newsome.html
Jeff ReichJeff_Reich.html
Contact uscontact.html
NewsletterDecember_2010_Newsletter.htmlOctober_2009_Newsletter.htmlshapeimage_151_link_0
GardenGarden.html

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Indigo Street PotteryHome.html
StudioStudio.html
Farraday NewsomeFarraday_Newsome.html
Jeff ReichJeff_Reich.html
Contact uscontact.html
NewsletterAugust_2011_Newsletter.htmlOctober_2009_Newsletter.htmlshapeimage_169_link_0
GardenGarden.html

May 2020 Newsletter

Indigo Street Studio Newsletter

Welcome to our monthly newsletter! It’s part of our website indigostreetpottery.com, which you can browse from this page if you click on the subjects in the header. We write here about our studio, arts events, projects, and garden.


Update: In these extraordinary times health and safety are a top priority. We feel fortunate to have a home studio and are busily creating new work. We are taking orders and shipping, and would be delighted to work with you via the internet.  indigostreetpottery@me.com

  

Indigo Street Studio Calendar

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In this Issue


1. Indigo Street Studio Calendar


2. Work-In-Progress at Indigo Street Studio


3. DelecTABLE: The Fine Art of Dining, Art Students League of Denver, Denver, Colorado


4. 23rd San Angelo National Ceramic Competition, San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts, San Angelo, Texas


5. Trip Notes From San Juan, Puerto Rico


6. Indigo Street Studio Kitchen Garden

Museum and show closed due to Covid-19: 41st Annual Contemporary Crafts, Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum, Mesa, Arizona


Gallery closed and show delayed with tentative new dates July 31 - August  30, 2020 due to Covid-19: DelecTABLE: The Fine Art of Dining, Art Students League of Denver,  Denver, Colorado


Museum closed and show postponed until further notice due to Covid-19: Twenty-Third San Angelo National Ceramic Competition, San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts, San Angelo, Texas


Show rescheduled to August 22 - September 26, 2020 due to Covid-19: Lip Service, Saratoga Clay Arts Center, Saratoga, New York

Roadside U.S.A.

i.d.e.a. Museum, Mesa, Arizona

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Jeff Reich recently took this photo in our Sonoran desert backyard during the evening beautiful hour. Arizona light, Arizona skies!

Trip Notes From San Juan, Puerto Rico

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23rd San Angelo National Ceramic Competition

San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts

San Angelo, Texas

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DelecTABLE: The Fine Art of Dining

Art Students League of Denver Denver, Colorado



NATIONAL JURIED EXHIBITION

Juror: Liz Zlot Summerfield


These two dishes by Farraday Newsome, Butterfly Dessert Bowl and Butterfly Cup, will be in the upcoming exhibition DelecTABLE: The Fine Art of Dining - Fifth Biennial Juried Exhibit of Functional Ceramics at the Art Students League of Denver. This national biennial was juried by studio ceramist Liz Zlot Summerfield.


Exhibition images are now available for viewing online: click here


The Art Students League of Denver is a community of artists enjoying the opportunity to study many media with regionally and nationally known artists. Modeled on the famous Art Students League of New York, The Art Students League of Denver first opened its doors in 1987 with a handful of recognized artists teaching over one hundred students within its first year. Today, located in the historic Sherman School in the West Washington Park area at 200 Grant Street, ASLD engages over 900 students a month with over 200 noted artists who teach diverse fine arts classes throughout the year. A 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, ASLD is supported by private donations, tuition, foundation grants, and the Scientific and Cultural Facilities District.

For more information


Where: Art Students League of Denver, 200 Grant St., Denver, Colorado 80203

When: delayed due to Covid-19, tentatively rescheduled for July 31 - August 30 , 2020

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Indigo Street Studio Kitchen Garden

Farraday Newsome will be showing Day in the upcoming 23rd San Angelo Ceramic National. This juried exhibition occurs every two years and is open to artists from the United States, Canada, and Mexico.


This year’s juror was Jo Lauria, a Los Angeles-based curator, writer and educator. A former curator at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Lauria is a specialist in the fields of design, craft, and the decorative arts with particular emphasis on modern and contemporary studio ceramics. She is the organizer of several national touring exhibitions as well as author of numerous publications: biographies that chart the lives and work of contemporary designers and craft artists; and survey books that chronicle major movements in the field. Most recently she received the American Ceramic Circle Book Award for Ralph Bacerra: Exquisite Beauty. Currently she is a contributing writer to Ornament Magazine, Mentor Faculty of Otis College of Art and Design, and Adjunct Curator of the American Museum of Ceramic Art (California). https://www.jolauria.com



For more information click:  http://www.samfa.org/ceramic-competition-invitational


Where: San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts, 1 Love St., San Angelo, Texas

When: postponed until further notice due to Covid-19

Farraday Newsome, Day, glazed terra cotta jar, 8 x 9.5 x 10.5”, 2019

We planted this dwarf black mulberry tree two years ago and this is the first  year it has produced fruit. The fruits are small, sweet, and black when ripe. We have been pleasantly surprised at the chance to pick a newly ripened batch every day! 

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Work-in-Progress at Indigo Street Studio

Farraday Newsome has been working on a series of large platters tentatively titled Memento Vitae (reminder of life), counterpoint to the well known memento mori (reminder of death) theme in art. The platters, approx. 27” before bisque firing, barely fit in the kiln and must be loaded with only the widely spread fingers of four hands.

Photo above: The breezy promontory at the entrance to the Bay of San Juan and the historical port city of San Juan, Puerto Rico. You can see the old fort (named Castillo San Felipe del Morro, and known as “El Morro”) at the upper left, a large city park, and, to the right,a graveyard overlooking the ocean.


When we travelled to the Caribbean in February we had no idea of the coming worldwide pandemic. While traveling, we heard a little news about a novel corona virus in Asia and then, shockingly suddenly, in Italy, but at that time we did not foresee how Covid-19 would upend lives around the world. We were fortunate to return home in early March in good health with no delays or trouble.


Our first stop on the trip was Old San Juan, Puerto Rico. Originally settled by the indigenous Taino people, it was declared a colony of Spain after Christopher Columbus arrived in 1493. Puerto Rico remained Spanish until the Spanish-American War four hundred years later. Cuba was fighting for its independence from Spain, and after an American ship, the Maine, mysteriously exploded in Havana’s harbor, the USA entered the war to liberate Cuba in 1898 and quickly declared victory. As part of the 1899 treaty (the Treaty of Paris), Spain relinquished Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Philippines to the USA. Cuba became an independent nation.


Puerto Rico remains a territory of the United States and is divided in its political aspirations. Some Puerto Ricans want independence, some want statehood, and some want to remain a territory. We found it incredible to have this centuries-old Spanish city and territory be part of the relatively young United States. With its historic district, Spanish-speaking citizens, cobbled streets, old city wall, and fortress, it felt like we were in Europe. We also saw continued devastation and dilapidation in the aftermath of 2017‘s Hurricane Maria, especially in the La Perla neighborhood of San Juan.

We had good rain this spring and the mint did well. We’ve been picking and drying it in the kitchen for iced mint tea later this summer.

Late spring is a colorful time in our kitchen garden. Nasturtiums, freesias, and sweet peas are blooming. Cilantro, dill, and lettuces have bolted and flowered. We let many of our winter greens go to seed so the bees can enjoy the flowers and so we get seeds to plant next fall. We’re still picking some winter greens like kale and chard, but they will bolt soon too. Winter gardening season will soon be over.

We were surprised to see that many of the streets in the old historic district paved with cobalt-blue glazed bricks. They are beautiful, but with light rain, quite slippery!

Many architectural features in Old San Juan, such as tportions of the old city wall and this elaborate fountain, were colorfully lit after dark. 

In the heart of historic Old San Juan there is a garden with this playful bronze sculpture, La Nave de Los Pinguinos (The Ship of the Penguins), made by Jorge Zeno, 2000.  Bronze sculptures and statues by a variety of artists are situated throughout the historic district.

These tall, imposing, sentry-like sculptures are grouped along a section of Old San Juan’s city wall.

El Morro, San Juan’s historic Spanish fort, was built in the 16th century under orders of King Charles V of Spain to protect the port. The site is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site as well as a USA Department of the Interior National Historic Site.

The obligatory vacation selfie from a now bygone era. Travel will be so much different in the future, we can’t even imagine.

Jeff Reich is glazing a variety of new small forms, including dinnerware and faceted bottles. He employs a technique using painter’s tape, wax resist, and layers of brushed glazes to achieve depth of color and texture in the cone 10 glaze firing.

Icey, our 10-yr old rescue Seal Point Balinese (long-haired Siamese) cat is back on the slab roller, near the window in the top photo. Shy and rarely seen by visitors, she’s always hanging around when it’s just us!

A full table of Jeff Reich’s new bisque ware waiting to be glazed.

A closer look at Jeff Reich’s in-progress tape-and-wax glazing process, with a finished, reference plate to the right.