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Indigo Street PotteryHome.html
StudioStudio.html
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Indigo Street PotteryHome.html
StudioStudio.html
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NewsletterOctober_2009_Newsletter.htmlshapeimage_125_link_0
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October 2011 Newsletter

Indigo Street Pottery Newsletter

Welcome to our monthly newsletter! It is part of our website indigostreetpottery.com , which you can browse from this page if you click on the subjects in the header. We write here about our studio, arts events, projects, studios of our friends, garden musings, and whatever else strikes our fancy. Hope you enjoy it!



August 13, 2011: 2011 Annual Art Auction, Anderson Ranch Art Center, Snowmass, Colorado www.andersonranch.org


May of 2012: Jeff Reich and Farraday Newsome, 2-person exhibition, Plinth Gallery, Denver, Colorado http://plinthgallery.com/

1                          Indigo Street Pottery Calendar

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Indigo Street PotteryHome.html
StudioStudio.html
Farraday NewsomeFarraday_Newsome.html
Jeff ReichJeff_Reich.html
Contact uscontact.html
NewsletterDecember_2010_Newsletter.htmlOctober_2009_Newsletter.htmlshapeimage_146_link_0
GardenGarden.html

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Indigo Street PotteryHome.html
StudioStudio.html
Farraday NewsomeFarraday_Newsome.html
Jeff ReichJeff_Reich.html
Contact uscontact.html
NewsletterAugust_2011_Newsletter.htmlOctober_2009_Newsletter.htmlshapeimage_164_link_0
GardenGarden.html

December 2019 Newsletter

Indigo Street Studio Newsletter

Welcome to our monthly newsletter! It’s part of our website indigostreetpottery.com, which you can browse from this page if you click on the subjects in the header. We write here about our studio, arts events, projects, and garden.

Indigo Street Studio Calendar

1



           

In this Issue


1. Indigo Street Studio Calendar


2. 2019 Indigo Street Studio Annual Holiday Event


3.  Indigo Street Studio Kitchen Garden

November 20, 2019, Williams & McBean Team 2nd Annual Art Show, The Vistas Pavilion, Las Sendas, 7555 E. Eagle Crest Drive, Mesa, Arizona


December 7-8 & 14-15, 2019: Indigo Street Studio 2019 Holiday Open Studio, both Saturdays 10am- 4pm, both Sundays 12pm - 4pm, at our home studio Indigo Street Studio

Roadside U.S.A.

i.d.e.a. Museum, Mesa, Arizona

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Indigo Street Studio Kitchen Garden

We’ve been developing an herb garden on the outside perimeter of the vegetable enclosure. We’re always on the look-out for herbs and heat-tolerant ornamentals that will withstand the ravages of hungry rabbits, squirrels, birds, and a dog with an adventurous palate! So far we’re having luck with oregano (foreground), irises, red autumn sage (Salvia greggii), rosemary, and society garlic. The big, red ceramic flower in the rosemary planter (upper left) was made by a former student of ours, Ms. Adrienne Hay.

2019 Indigo Street Studio

Annual Holiday Event

This year’s 2019 Indigo Street Studio Holiday Event will be the first two full weekends in December:


When: Saturday, December 7 10am - 4pm

            Sunday, December 8     12pm-4pm


            Saturday, December 14 10am - 4pm

            Sunday, December 15   12pm - 4pm


Where: 6931 E. Indigo St., Mesa AZ 85207  For driving directions, click here!


We set up our Holiday Event in our studio workspace and showroom. We hope you can come by to enjoy the art, native landscaping, kitchen garden, hot coffee, and snacks!


We have beautiful work in a wide price range, with items from under $50 on up to collector level. We  are delighted that you make time to visit and give us a chance to  catch up with how you’ve been this past year. Garden tours for the asking! Also free kale seeds and snow pea seeds collected from our  garden!


We are working on new items for the holiday event this month. Below are photos of available, finished work.

We have lots of new birds-on-a-wire. These popular items are glazed terra cotta birds epoxied to solid copper wire & nice for putting in your yard or planter (or wherever else you dream!) $35 each.

There will be plenty of cups from which to choose! Above are a few examples.

This past month we spread wood chips on our kitchen garden paths and around the fruit trees. Unlike compost, wood chips should not be dug into soil since their decomposition initially decreases the amount of available soil nitrogen. Wood chips are an excellent soil-building mulch however. Their eventual breakdown releases a host of nutrients into the soil. Very importantly, the breakdown of complex wood compounds such as lignins encourages the growth of fungal mycorrhizae in the soil. Mycorrhizae are the very fine, whitish, filamentous fungal network that enable plant roots to absorb many soil nutrients.

It is important to leave the tree trunks untouched by the chip mulch in order to prevent rot. The mulch should be placed like a big pillowy doughnut with the tree trunk in the middle of the doughnut hole! The chips were supplied free of charge by a local tree trimmer. It is a win-win: they are great for our local soil, they won’t be dumped into the local landfill, and the tree trimmers are spared the dump charges!

Left photo: Wood chips piled high around our calamondin tree (Citrus mitis), a citrus that originated in China. Calamondins produce small, sweet-tart fruit popular in Philippine cuisine and sometimes called the “Philippine Lime”. Somewhat larger than kumquat fruits, each calamondin fruit is about the size of a ping pong ball.

Right photo: Chips piled generously around a young loquat (left) and grapefruit (right). The thick chip mulch helps young trees survive our summer heat by preserving soil moisture.


It’s so fun to plant sunflowers in with the garden vegetables! Not only are they beautiful and edible, but they are also a great food source for bees. We see lots of European honeybees (non-native) like the one at 3 o’clock on this flower’s pollen-laden ring, as well as a wide variety of local, native bees.

Our annual holiday studio sale is coming up soon! It will be the first full two weekends of December: December 7 & 8 and December 14 & 15, 2019. Above are a few small works by Jeff Reich and Farraday Newsome that will be available, along with a lot more!

Information, hours, location, and photos below.

Jeff Reich, Allthorn series, 14.5 x 14.5 x 2”, 2011, wired to hang

Jeff Reich, Allthorn, stoneware, 9 x 9 x 10.5”, 2018

There will be plenty of Reich’s popular stoneware trays. Each is glazed differently and all are approximately 17 x 7 x 1”.

We will also have some of our paintings on display. Below are examples.

Jeff Reich, Clouds series, acrylic on canvas, 12 x 12”, 2019

Jeff Reich, Clouds of Whispering Pines, acrylic on birch panel,  2018

Farraday Newsome, Boulders On the East Verde River, acrylic on canvas, 24” x 20”,  2019

Farraday Newsome, Forest and Boulders at River’s Edge, acrylic on canvas, 24” x 20”, 2019

Jeff Reich, Agave Fields series, stoneware, boxy wall tile wired to hang, 11.5 x 13.5 x 3”, 2018

Farraday Newsome, Autumn Forest, glazed terra cotta, 8.5” h x 8”d, 2019

Farraday Newsome, Evening, glazed terra cotta jar, 8 x 8 x 8”, 2019

Farraday Newsome, Winter Forest, glazed terra cotta platter, 24.5 x 24.5 x 4”, 2019, wired and ready to hang