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Indigo Street PotteryHome.html
StudioStudio.html
Farraday NewsomeFarraday_Newsome.html
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NewsletterDecember_2010_Newsletter.htmlOctober_2009_Newsletter.htmlshapeimage_104_link_0
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Indigo Street PotteryHome.html
StudioStudio.html
Farraday NewsomeFarraday_Newsome.html
Jeff ReichJeff_Reich.html
Contact uscontact.html
NewsletterNovember_2019_Newsletter.htmlOctober_2009_Newsletter.htmlshapeimage_122_link_0
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October 2011 Newsletter

Indigo Street Pottery Newsletter

Welcome to our monthly newsletter! It is part of our website indigostreetpottery.com , which you can browse from this page if you click on the subjects in the header. We write here about our studio, arts events, projects, studios of our friends, garden musings, and whatever else strikes our fancy. Hope you enjoy it!



August 13, 2011: 2011 Annual Art Auction, Anderson Ranch Art Center, Snowmass, Colorado www.andersonranch.org


May of 2012: Jeff Reich and Farraday Newsome, 2-person exhibition, Plinth Gallery, Denver, Colorado http://plinthgallery.com/

1                          Indigo Street Pottery Calendar

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Indigo Street PotteryHome.html
StudioStudio.html
Farraday NewsomeFarraday_Newsome.html
Jeff ReichJeff_Reich.html
Contact uscontact.html
NewsletterDecember_2010_Newsletter.htmlOctober_2009_Newsletter.htmlshapeimage_143_link_0
GardenGarden.html

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Indigo Street PotteryHome.html
StudioStudio.html
Farraday NewsomeFarraday_Newsome.html
Jeff ReichJeff_Reich.html
Contact uscontact.html
NewsletterAugust_2011_Newsletter.htmlOctober_2009_Newsletter.htmlshapeimage_161_link_0
GardenGarden.html

September 2019 Newsletter

Indigo Street Studio Newsletter

Welcome to our monthly newsletter! It’s part of our website indigostreetpottery.com, which you can browse from this page if you click on the subjects in the header. We write here about our studio, arts events, projects, and garden.

Indigo Street Studio Calendar

1



           

In this Issue


1. Indigo Street Studio Calendar


2.  Adorned, Clay Center of New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana


3. Workhouse Clay International 2019, Workhouse Arts Center, Lorton, Virginia


4. Roadside U.S.A., i.d.e.a. Museum, Mesa, Arizona


5. August in the Pines


6. A Rim Country Garden Visit with Dave Owens and Laurie Mahoney

Jeff  Reich, untitled, acrylic on canvas, 12 x 12”, painted during our recent stay in the Arizona pines.

5

August in the Pines

Roadside U.S.A.

i.d.e.a. Museum

Mesa, Arizona

4

Farraday Newsome and her grouping of aspen-themed pieces in the summer show Roadside USA currently at the i.d.e.a. Museum in Mesa, Arizona. Fifty-five artists are represented in this exhibition. Museum art-making activities and interactives focus on exploring the five regions of the United States. Newsome’s work is among works with a Rocky Mountain and Northern Arizona theme.

https://www.ideamuseum.org/museum-events/

Where:  i.d.e.a.Museum, 150 Pepper Place, Mesa, Arizona 85201 

When: June 14 - October 4, 2019

June 14 - October 4, 2019: Roadside USA, i.d.e.a. Museum, Mesa, Arizona. Opening reception June 13, 5-7pm


August 10 - October 13, 2019: Workhouse Clay International 2019, Workhouse Arts Center, Lorton, Virginia


September 6 - 28, 2019: Adorned, New Orleans Clay Center, New Orleans, Louisiana

Roadside U.S.A.

i.d.e.a. Museum, Mesa, Arizona

4

Workhouse Clay International 2019

Workhouse Arts Center

Lorton, Virginia

3

Farraday Newsome is showing Lively Bowl with Oranges (glazed terra cotta, 3.75” tall x 14’ diameter, 2017) in the current exhibit Workhouse Clay International 2019 at the Workhouse Arts Center http://www.workhousearts.org in Lorton, Virginia. This show of sculptural and functional ceramics was juried by studio ceramist Peter Beasecker of Syracuse, NY.  http://peter-beasecker.com .


Lively Bowl with Oranges will be in the “Exposure” section of the October 2019 issue of Ceramics Monthly, along with a number of other pieces in the show.


Where: Workhouse Arts Center, Vulcan Gallery, Building W-16, 9518 Workhouse Road, Lorton, Virginia 22079

When: August 10 - October 13, 2019. Opening reception August 10, 2019 from 6 - 8pm

2

Adorned

Clay Center of New Orleans

New Orleans, Louisiana

Artwork:

"Coral Bowl with Dogwood Flowers and Swallowtail Butterflies"

Farraday Newsome, 2017

"ADORNED," SEPTEMBER 6-28, 2019

The Clay Center is proud to present "Adorned," a group exhibition juried by Liz Zlot Summerfield that explores and celebrates the ceramic surface as an opportunity for imagery, pattern, texture, decoration, narrative, and commentary. Featuring ceramic vessels, sculptures, and wall- mounted works, this exhibition will be on display September 6 to 28, 2019 in the Clay Center gallery.


Opening Reception and Happy Hour

First Friday at ArtEgg Studios

September 6, 2019, 5 - 8 pm

Complimentary drinks and snacks!


Current and upcoming exhibitions at the Clay Center of New Orleans

The Clay Center of New Orleans is a nonprofit  organization that brings  ceramic art education and professional opportunities to one central location.

Mary Cross, Tulane University News. For the entire August of 2018 article explaining how this space came to be, click: Tulane University News article about the Clay Center of New Orleans

Farraday Newsome, acrylic on canvas. Each as of yet untitled, 24” h x 20” w, 2019

After a sad week in Michigan for Jeff’s mother’s funeral, we rented a cabin in the Arizona pines for the rest of August. We brought our easels and paints for a self-styled artists’ retreat. In the photos above Jeff is working on a 12 x 12” painting, part of his ongoing series of clouds and geometric shapes. Farraday is working on a painting of a ponderosa pine and a juniper.

Farraday Newsome, untitled, acrylic on canvas, 24” h x 20” w, 2019

6

A Rim Country Garden Visit with Dave Owens and Laurie Mahoney

Jeff Reich, untitled, acrylic on canvas, 12 x 12”, 2019

While we were there, Jeff continued training for his upcoming September marathon that will be in the Cascade Mountains of WA. Meanwhile, Farraday logged many miles hiking and exploring the region. Skye, our dog, got to enjoy it all!

We were fortunate enough to meet Dave Owens and his wife Laurie Mahoney by chance last year during our stay in the Arizona pines. This summer we were delighted to get to know them better during a very enjoyable visit to their Arizona Rim Country farm and home.

Dave has dedicated his career to educating and inspiring Sonoran Desert gardeners with organic gardening techniques for the hot desert climate.  https://gardenguy.com

Laurie is dedicated to the study and preparation of natural, herbal medicinals and is an avid gardener.

Dave Owens, The Garden Guy, generously picking collard greens for us at his high country home and farm in Arizona’s Rim Country.

Dave has written several very popular gardening books for gardeners in the low desert.

He also has a gardening show on Channel 3 in Phoenix.

Dave and Laurie are growing hops, the vine to the right. Laurie is harvesting the pale yellowish flowers to prepare tinctures for medicinal uses that include treating insomnia and anxiety.

Their farm occupies land first homesteaded in the mid-1800’s. Once river bottom, the soil is naturally rich.

Dave and Laurie’s farm is comprised of an apple orchard and five large, fenced, gardened areas. The tall fencing is necessary to keep out elk and any number of other hungry animals. Animals are not the only threat to crops here though. This year saw a very heavy, very late snowfall that wiped out the normally large heirloom tomato crop, as well as many other freeze sensitive spring plantings.

Their newest project is a recently planted vineyard that includes tempernillo and cabernet varietals. The vines were planted bareroot and have leafed out nicely. The vineyard is drip irrigated. The copper plate on the fence post, right photo, is marked CAB for cabernet. All of the rows are similarly labelled. Production should begin in three to five years!

This building on the property was built by the original farming homesteaders in the 1860’s. It is the only remaining structure from that time and has always been a shed. Dave showed us an old  b&w photo of the original home, now gone, which housed the family and their livestock under one roof.

There is a row of very old, very tall pear trees on the property. The trees towered above us at least thirty feet. We had to crane our necks to peer up into them. There was fruit on the branches.