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October 2011 Newsletter

Indigo Street Pottery Newsletter

Welcome to our monthly newsletter! It is part of our website indigostreetpottery.com , which you can browse from this page if you click on the subjects in the header. We write here about our studio, arts events, projects, studios of our friends, garden musings, and whatever else strikes our fancy. Hope you enjoy it!



August 13, 2011: 2011 Annual Art Auction, Anderson Ranch Art Center, Snowmass, Colorado www.andersonranch.org


May of 2012: Jeff Reich and Farraday Newsome, 2-person exhibition, Plinth Gallery, Denver, Colorado http://plinthgallery.com/

1                          Indigo Street Pottery Calendar

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Indigo Street PotteryHome.html
StudioStudio.html
Farraday NewsomeFarraday_Newsome.html
Jeff ReichJeff_Reich.html
Contact uscontact.html
NewsletterDecember_2010_Newsletter.htmlOctober_2009_Newsletter.htmlshapeimage_92_link_0
GardenGarden.html

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Indigo Street PotteryHome.html
StudioStudio.html
Farraday NewsomeFarraday_Newsome.html
Jeff ReichJeff_Reich.html
Contact uscontact.html
NewsletterAugust_2011_Newsletter.htmlOctober_2009_Newsletter.htmlshapeimage_110_link_0
GardenGarden.html

September 2014 Newsletter

Indigo Street Pottery Newsletter

In this Issue

1. Indigo Street Pottery Calendar


2.  Jeff Reich: Cube Sculpture, Recently Finished Commission is 4th in Series


3.  Farraday Newsome: Cutting a Lidded Box


4.  The Seven C’s of Arizona, Phoenix Airport Museum


5.  50 From 6: Ceramics Invitational at Southern Utah University


6.  Jeff Reich Runs Half Marathon in San Diego


7.  Indigo Street Pottery Native Landscape Notes


8.  Indigo Street Pottery Kitchen Garden Notes

Welcome to our monthly newsletter! It is part of our website indigostreetpottery.com , which you can browse from this page if you click on the subjects in the header. We write here about our studio, arts events, projects, studios of our friends, garden musings, and whatever else strikes our fancy. Hope you enjoy it!

Indigo Street Pottery Calendar

50 from 6: Ceramics Invitational  at Southern Utah University  

1

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Indigo Street Pottery Native Landscape Notes

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5

Jeff Reich: Cube Sculpture, Recently Completed Commission is 4th in Series

2

Farraday Newsome, Darkness is a Garden, glazed terra cotta teapot, 9 x 12.5 x 9”, 2013

Indigo Street Pottery Kitchen Garden Notes

Jeff Reich, Allthorn, glazed stoneware, 23 x 18 x 18”, 2012


September 25 - November 8, 2014 : 50 From 6: Contemporary Ceramic Art From Six Rocky Mountain States, Braithwaite Fine Arts Gallery, Southern Utah University, Cedar City, Utah

https://www.suu.edu/pva/artgallery/


October 5, 2014 - April 19, 2015: The Seven Cs of Arizona, Phoenix Airport Museum, Terminal 4, Phoenix, Arizona


November 7 - 9, 2014: 21st Annual SOFA Chicago, Farraday Newsome represented by Katie Gingrass Gallery, Chicago, Illinois  http://www.gingrassgallery.com    http://www.sofaexpo.com


February 21 & 22, 2015, 10 a.m.– 5p.m. both days: ASU Art Museum Ceramic Research Center’s 14th Annual Ceramic Studio Tour.  Indigo Street Pottery is a host site with Jeff Reich, Farraday Newsome, and guest artists Jesse Armstrong and Tiffany Bailey.

asuartmuseum.asu.edu/ceramicsresearchcenter


May 16 - July 5, 2015: Farraday Newsome, Clay Art Center, Port Chester, New York

http://www.clayartcenter.org/default.asp

The 7 Cs of Arizona, Phoenix Airport Museum

4

Farraday Newsome: Cutting a Lidded Box

3

We have two summers here in the Sonoran desert. The first is the infamously harsh, dry summer of May, June and early July. Then the season shifts to our second summer with a changing direction of the wind bringing moisture up from the Gulf of Mexico and the Sea of Cortez. This predictable change in wind direction ushers is a true monsoon season. It initially brings the dust storms that make national news: tall, dense, and brown-orange with dry dirt particles. The life-sustaining rains that follow are the heaviest of the year and bring on rapid blooming. The resultant flowers attract many species of bees and myriad other insects that have survived the lean season.


Photos below: some of the plants blooming now on our native wildscaped property.

Tenaza (Havardia pallens), with a European honeybee gathering nectar. This small, hardy tree is native to the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas and the southern coast of Texas. It is shrubby and spiny.

Native to the Sonoran desert, Beebrush (Aloysia wrightii) has the most wonderful, delicate scent. It’s nectar is a food source for native solitary bees as well as for the native rustic sphinx moth. This shrub is thornless and its seeds attract American goldfinches.

Photos above, also from our landscape, left to right:

1. Pincushion Cactus (Mamillaria grahamii), a locally native cactus in full bloom.

2. Pink Pavonia (Pavonia hastata), a member of the mallow family, native to South America and one of our few non-native plants.

3. Velvet Pod Mimosa (Mimosa dysocarpa) is native to the Southwest’s Chihuahuan desert

Although we’ve gone to great pains to choose figs with very small or closed eyes (the eye is the small opening at the end of a fig, opposite to where it attaches to a branch), we were finding that the tiniest ants we’ve ever seen were still regularly getting inside the fruit.  This year we tied organza “wedding favor” bags on tightly while the figs were still green and they have worked well keeping ants out while the figs ripen. This fig tree is a Texas Blue Giant. Interestingly, a fig is actually comprised of many small flowers enveloped by a hollow, fleshy structure called a syconium.

Farraday Newsome has been invited to participate in the upcoming exhibition The 7 Cs of Arizona at the Phoenix Airport Museum, Sky Harbor Airport, Terminal 4, Phoenix, Arizona. The show’s title refers to the original five economic Cs of Arizona: Cotton, Copper, Citrus, Cattle, and Climate. The exhibition’s curators have added two more Cs: Cactus and Canyon. Farraday’s pieces will, quite logically, refer to the Citrus industry.

Farraday Newsome and Jeff Reich are included in the upcoming ceramics invitational exhibition 50 from 6: Contemporary Ceramic Art from Six Rocky Mountain States . It will open this fall at the Braithwaite Fine Arts Gallery, Southern Utah University, Cedar City, Utah.


Fifty ceramic artists from six western states were invited to participate. The show was curated by Southern Utah University’s Professor Susan Harris and Assistant Professor Russell Wrankle.

The exhibit will run from September 25 to November 8, 2014. A catalog will be published.

https://www.suu.edu/pva/artgallery/index.html

Our Mimosa dysocarpa blooming in response to recent heavy monsoon rains.

This large, high-fired sculptural cube is Jeff Reich’s fourth in his Allthorn cube series. It was commissioned by a collector on the East Coast. Jeff continues to reference plants of the Sonoran desert in his brushed and scratched glazing style that is reminiscent of color field painting. 

After constructing a closed box and attaching three dimensional imagery, Farraday Newsome is ready to cut the lid line. Using a potter’s fettling knife, she cuts through the wall to separate the lid from the box, holding the knife at a downward slant of about forty-five degrees while cutting. The resultant slanted edge will make for a more secure fitting lid.

After the lid is cut free, Farraday smooths all cut edges of the box and the lid with a piece of rough green scrubby, then a sponge, and finally with her fingers. Once the edges are done, she puts the lid back on the box and lets the piece dry slowly under fabric and plastic for several weeks.

Farraday Newsome, Large Platter with Oranges and Pomegranates, glazed terra cotta, 23 x 23 x 4”, 2010

Farraday Newsome, Dark Green Vase with Oranges, Pinecones and Moon Shells, glazed terra cotta, 15 x 13 x 11”, 2012

Jeff Reich Runs A Half Marathon in San Diego

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We never know if a variegated variety of a tried and true favorite will have the strength to thrive in our desert heat, so we are happy to report that this purple-veined basil is doing very well.  People have been interested in our vegan basil pesto recipe, curious as to how we make pesto with our whole food, plant-based diet. Well, it is easy and delicious, so here it is again, back by popular demand!


Put a couple cloves of fresh garlic, 2 TBSP white miso, 1 TBSP nutritional yeast, 1/4 cup of pine nuts or walnuts, and about 1/4 c lemon juice into your food processor. Then fill the food processor up with basil leaves. Process to a thickly liquid paste, stopping to shove whole basil leaves down as necessary. Add  more basil leaves, more garlic, etc. as you like - to taste. Toss the bright green pesto onto hot pasta. We usually mix in freshly chopped tomatoes and steamed peas for more color and nutrition. Heaven in a bowl!!


The miso & yeast replace parmesan cheese for the salty, protein umami flavor. The nuts replace the olive oil. We don’t use pure oil since it is nutrient poor and calorie dense. Instead, we use nutrient and fiber rich whole food sources of fat such as nuts, avocados, soybean products, corn, olives, etc.

Jeff ran the 37th Annual America’s Finest City Half Marathon in San Diego, California this month. The race began up at the end of Point Loma, descended into downtown San Diego, then climbed up again to finish in Balboa Park. It was an unusually warm and humid day, conditions were described by some as “brutal”. Jeff was pleased with his effort, placing 489th overall out of a field of approximately 8,000 runners. He was the 371st man in and ranked 28th in his age division with a time of 1:46:36.

Unfortunately, Farraday couldn’t join him due to a foot injury and surgery scheduled soon.

The rest of our stay in San Diego was pure R & R.  The photos below are of Dog Beach out on Coronado Island (Point Loma in the background), the herb garden at the Hotel del Coronado, and Jeff apparently cracking Farraday up on Coronado Beach.