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October 2011 Newsletter

Indigo Street Pottery Newsletter

Welcome to our monthly newsletter! It is part of our website indigostreetpottery.com , which you can browse from this page if you click on the subjects in the header. We write here about our studio, arts events, projects, studios of our friends, garden musings, and whatever else strikes our fancy. Hope you enjoy it!



August 13, 2011: 2011 Annual Art Auction, Anderson Ranch Art Center, Snowmass, Colorado www.andersonranch.org


May of 2012: Jeff Reich and Farraday Newsome, 2-person exhibition, Plinth Gallery, Denver, Colorado http://plinthgallery.com/

1                          Indigo Street Pottery Calendar

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Indigo Street PotteryHome.html
StudioStudio.html
Farraday NewsomeFarraday_Newsome.html
Jeff ReichJeff_Reich.html
Contact uscontact.html
NewsletterDecember_2010_Newsletter.htmlOctober_2009_Newsletter.htmlshapeimage_110_link_0
GardenGarden.html

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Indigo Street PotteryHome.html
StudioStudio.html
Farraday NewsomeFarraday_Newsome.html
Jeff ReichJeff_Reich.html
Contact uscontact.html
NewsletterAugust_2011_Newsletter.htmlOctober_2009_Newsletter.htmlshapeimage_128_link_0
GardenGarden.html

May 2016 Newsletter

Indigo Street Studio Newsletter

This is a detail of one of the large, beautiful and mysterious Alhambra Vases, the Hornos Vase. Nine intact Alhambra Vases are known to still exist, as well as large and small shards, but it is agreed among scholars that more must have been made. These large-scaled vessels were made in Islamic Al-Andalus (now Andalucia, Spain) during the 14thC, a time of relative peace and of great artistic achievement. The vases are considered to be the most masterful creations of medieval Islamic ceramics. Five of the vases are housed in Spanish museums, which we visited on this trip. The other four are in Russia’s Hermitage Museum, Sweden’s National Museum,  the Freer Gallery of the Smithsonian Museum, and Italy’s Palermo Museum.

Welcome to our monthly newsletter! It is part of our website, which you can browse from this page if you click on the subjects in the header. We write here about our studio, arts events, projects, studios of our friends and garden musings.

Spain!

Salvador Dali, The Pearl, after La Infanta Margarita de Austria de Velasquez, 1981

Jeff Reich at the Dali Museum in Figueres, Spain

Our trip began in Madrid. In this photo we are enjoying a cup of coffee in Madrid’s Plaza Mayor. This large, cobbled plaza was the city’s main square in medieval times, and has witnessed magnificent royal pageantry over the centuries, as well as bull-fighting and horrors of the Spanish Inquisition.

Two of the nine known remaining Alhambra Vases are in Madrid’s National Archaeology Museum. These vases play a role in Farraday’s book. She had a great, pre-arranged meeting with one of the museum’s experts while we were there. We saw two more of these vases and spoke to more people later in the trip when we were at the Museum of the Alhambra in Granada.

In addition to book research, this trip was also about relaxation and fun! We enjoyed a pleasant afternoon exploring Madrid’s spectacular Retiro Park, which was once the private and lavish garden of the royals but now is Madrid’s grand public park. The photo on the left is the lovely Crystal Palace. On the right we are in front of fantastic sculpted trees.

We just returned from three weeks in Spain, a trip that was inspired by Farraday’s need to do some research for her in-progress historical fiction novel that is partially set in 13th-15thC Spain. We had an amazing and beautiful trip.

After a few days in Madrid we used our Eurail passes to take the high speed AVE train to Barcelona, a trip of about three hours. The two photos above are from Antoni Gaudi’s astonishing church La Sagrada Familia in Barcelona, begun in 1883 and still under construction. All entry ticket proceeds go towards construction, with a goal of project completion in 2026, marking the 100th anniversary of Gaudi’s death. There will be huge celebrations -see you there!

We stayed several days in Barcelona. The pair of photos above is from another of Gaudi’s famous Barcelona projects, Park Guell. Gaudi had initially been hired to design an exclusive, upscale  subdivision, but the unwieldy project failed economically and the site was eventually completed as a public park.

We enjoyed a late nightcap in this sublimely lit plaza in the old Gothic quarter of Barcelona. A lone flugelhorn player was also there, filling the space with further melancholy and haunting beauty.

Barcelona’s walkway along the Mediterranean shore is very modern. The copper-colored big fish in the background is a large Frank Gehry sculpture.

While we were in Barcelona we took a day trip north to Figueres, home of the Dali Museum and near the Spanish-French border.

While  in Madrid we stayed at the charming Hotel Europa, located near bustling Puerta del Sol. We were wowed by this impressive Juan Miro replica in our hotel’s elegant lobby.

From Barcelona we hopped back on the AVE train and headed for Sevilla, a six hour trip. This fabulous old Andalucian city has a deep beauty and richness borne of centuries of Christian, Jewish and Islamic cultural intermixing.

Sevilla’s Royal Alcazar (palace), built by Catholic King Pedro I (1334-1369), continues to house royals to this day, but also maintains large areas as a public museum.

This palace is a splendid complex of Mudejar buildings, the distinctly Spanish blending of Christian and Islamic styles and aesthetic.  It is where King Ferdinand and Queen Isabel later held an audience with Christopher Columbus after his voyage to the New World.

The  palace grounds are vast and composed of many interconnected gardens, some large and some intimate in scale. Water features abound, from small fountains to large pools enlivened by the rippling of flowing water.

Here is another photo from Sevilla’s Royal Alcazar. As much as we loved Sevilla, after a few days it was time to push off for regions deeper into Andalucia.

We will continue our Spain travel log in next month’s newsletter!

Here are a couple more photos from our visit to Park Guell. On the left is a wisteria-bowered garden gate and on the right is one of the few houses completed for the ill-fated subdivision. It now functions as a museum shop.