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October 2011 Newsletter

Indigo Street Pottery Newsletter

Welcome to our monthly newsletter! It is part of our website indigostreetpottery.com , which you can browse from this page if you click on the subjects in the header. We write here about our studio, arts events, projects, studios of our friends, garden musings, and whatever else strikes our fancy. Hope you enjoy it!



August 13, 2011: 2011 Annual Art Auction, Anderson Ranch Art Center, Snowmass, Colorado www.andersonranch.org


May of 2012: Jeff Reich and Farraday Newsome, 2-person exhibition, Plinth Gallery, Denver, Colorado http://plinthgallery.com/

1                          Indigo Street Pottery Calendar

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Indigo Street PotteryHome.html
StudioStudio.html
Farraday NewsomeFarraday_Newsome.html
Jeff ReichJeff_Reich.html
Contact uscontact.html
NewsletterDecember_2010_Newsletter.htmlOctober_2009_Newsletter.htmlshapeimage_101_link_0
GardenGarden.html

Text

Text

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Indigo Street PotteryHome.html
StudioStudio.html
Farraday NewsomeFarraday_Newsome.html
Jeff ReichJeff_Reich.html
Contact uscontact.html
NewsletterAugust_2011_Newsletter.htmlOctober_2009_Newsletter.htmlshapeimage_119_link_0
GardenGarden.html

August  2015 Newsletter

Indigo Street Pottery Newsletter

In this Issue

1. Indigo Street Pottery Calendar


2. Farraday Newsome Workshop at Santa Fe Clay, New Mexico


  1. 3. Visiting Santa Fe, New Mexico


4. Tempe Center for the Arts: Birds of a Feather


5. Indigo Street Pottery Kitchen Garden

Welcome to our monthly newsletter! It is part of our website indigostreetpottery.com , which you can browse from this page if you click on the subjects in the header. We write here about our studio, arts events, projects, studios of our friends, garden musings, and whatever else strikes our fancy. Hope you enjoy it!

Indigo Street Pottery Calendar

Indigo Street Pottery Kitchen Garden

1

5

June 19 - September 19, 2015: Birds of a Feather, Tempe Arts Center, Tempe, Arizona

http://www.tempe.gov/city-hall/community-services/tempe-center-for-the-arts/gallery-at-tca


November 7, 2015: Tour de Bird, a Backyard Bird Habitat event sponsored by the Desert Rivers Audubon Chapter of the National Audubon Society, Indigo Street Pottery’s native landscaped yard will be a site


December 5, 6 & 12,13, 2015: Indigo Street Pottery 2015 Holiday Studio Sale, Saturdays 10am- 4pm, Sundays 12pm - 4pm, at our home studio

February 20 & 21, 2015, 10am - 5pm: ASU Art Museum Ceramic Research Center’s 15th Annual Ceramic Studio Tour, Indigo Street Pottery will be a host site, asuartmuseum.asu.edu/ceramicsresearchcenter


February - April 2016: Jeff Reich solo show, Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum, Mesa, Arizona

http://www.mesaartscenter.com/art-exhibitions-contemporary-art-gallery.html


May 24 - August 27, 2016: Jeff Reich solo show, Visual Arts Gallery, Central Arizona College, Coolidge, Arizona

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Farraday Newsome Conducts a Summer Series Workshop at Santa Fe Clay

3

Visiting Santa Fe, New Mexico

4

Tempe Center for the Arts: Birds of a Feather

HP Bloomer, Vase, porcelain, 16 x 6 x 6”, soda fired, 2015

Jeff and Farraday enjoying their new HP Bloomer Talk Nerdy cups!

HP Bloomer, Serving Tray, porcelain, 4 x 8 x 6”, soda fired, 2015

HP Bloomer, Serving Dish, porcelain, 4 x 11 x 11”, soda fired, 2015

During the workshop Farraday had two excellent, hard-working assistants: HP Bloomer and Emily Shiell. HP and Emily are both very talented ceramic artists and it was a pleasure getting to know them!


HP Bloomer is the Studio Manager at Santa Fe Clay http://www.hpbloomer.com.  He manages the education component of Santa Fe Clay, as well as overseeing the studio kilns, firings, glazes, etc. the photos below are examples of his work.

Avra Leodas, owner and director of Santa Fe Clay, is a ceramic artist and showed her studio work with Joanne Rapp at The Hand and the Spirit Gallery in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Left: Avra Leodas, Vessel, 1989

Right: Avra Leodas, Blue Vase

Santa Fe Clay was established in 1974 as a ceramic supply business, making it the longest existing business in the Santa Fe Railyard. Avra Leodas arrived in 1994 and  became both the owner and director, adding a full schedule of classes for all ages, and establishing the Summer Workshop Program, which brings masters in the field to teach week-long intensive workshops. The gallery was built in 1998 showcasing the work of artists from the national field in monthly exhibits. 

In addition to the gallery shows at Santa Fe Clay, Avra has also curated the dinnerware show La Mesa at NCECA for many years (photo below, right). A nice interview with Avra Leodas by ceramic artist Julia Galloway in 2008 can be read on Galloway’s site http://juliagalloway.com/field-guide/chapter-11/avra-leodas/.

 

Photos above are from Julia Galloway’s website http://www.juliagalloway.com.

Left: Avra Leodas installing a show with Peter Beasecker’s work http://peter-beasecker.com

Right: The La Mesa dinnerware show at Santa Fe Clay http://www.santafeclay.com/santa-fe-clay-presents-la/.

Above and to right: This is the oldest house in Santa Fe, dating to circa 1646 CE. It is located on De Vargas Street and is open to the public with an interpretive museum.

The Spanish Market, an annual event in Santa Fe, was held during our visit. It had street after street of booths displaying contemporary and traditional art based on the Spanish colonial style. The event is sponsored by the Spanish Colonial Arts Society of  Santa Fe’s Museum of Spanish Colonial Art. http://spanishcolonial.org

Bandelier National Monument is located about an hour’s drive northwest of Santa Fe in Frijoles Canyon. It is a spectacular archaeological site with evidence of human presence dating to over 11,000 years ago. Ancestral Pueblo people occupied the area from approximately 1150 CE to 1550 CE before moving closer to the Rio Grande River. The people of this site lived in two riverside towns as well as in numerous cliff dwellings dug into the soft, volcanic tuff of the canyon walls. Modern people of nearby Cochiti Pueblo are the most direct descendants of these Native Americans, but an ancestral link is also held by the people of San Ildefonso, Santo Domingo, Santa Clara, San Felipe, and Zuni Pueblos.

http://www.nps.gov/band/index.htm

Three of Farraday Newsome’s large, sculptural glazed terra cotta birds are included in the current exhibition Birds of a Feather in the Gallery at Tempe Center for the Arts. The show runs June 19 - September 19, 2015.

http://www.tempe.gov/city-hall/community-services/tempe-center-for-the-arts/gallery-at-tca

Farraday’s pieces are at the entrance to the show. From front to back: Fern Bird, Unseen Drift series, glazed terra cotta, 28.5 x 17 x 16”, 2009;  Agave Bird, Unseen Drift series, glazed terra cotta, 33 x 18 x 18”, 2009; and, in the rear, Genetic Drift, Unseen Drift series, glazed terra cotta, 29 x 17 x 15”, 2007.

Emily Shiell, pitcher

Emily Shiell is a fourth year BFA candidate at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. http://emshiell.wix.com/emshiellarts?fb_ref=Default  She travelled to Santa Fe to be my assistant during my workshop. Examples of her work are below.

Emily Shiell, pouring vessel

Emily Shiell, four cups

Emily Shiell, vessel

Farraday Newsome (center rear with sleeveless green top) surrounded by students on the last day of her hand-building and maiolica glazing workshop “Florabundance”, Santa Fe Clay, July 20 - 24th, 2015.  Students came from Colorado, Nevada, Texas, New Mexico, California and Arizona for this intensive workshop. http://www.santafeclay.com/summerworkshops_2015/

Photo courtesy of HP Bloomer, Santa Fe Clay Studio Manager.

This is Santa Fe Clay’s beautiful new addition. It gives the renowned facility a large, sunny new classroom, new space for the gas and salt kilns, and elegant access from the stylish Railyard Arts District  http://www.santaferailyardartsdistrict.com which has steadily developed around Santa Fe Clay for the past decade. Farraday Newsome taught a week-long workshop here this past month as part of Santa Fe Clay’s popular Summer Workshop Series.

http://www.santafeclay.com/summerworkshops_2015/

We are well into summer, a trying season in the Sonoran desert. The weather has been well over 100 degrees for most days since May. Clouds build up most afternoons now, but rain is rare. It is a desert after all! We use a drip irrigation system to water the kitchen garden every evening for about an hour, but we still need to augment with hand watering periodically. 

The Italian Basil is doing well, but loves extra water and afternoon shade..It is a little spindly this year since we’ve been away so much: New York in May, Colorado in June and now Santa Fe in July.  It would rather we were home every day to give it a little extra drink!

Swiss chard is the workhorse of the garden. It produces all year, despite winter freezes and summer heat. It really only gives up the ghost after flowering and going to seed, which is usually when it is around two years old.

The main fig crop is just about over, just a few late stragglers still on the tree. We bagged all of the figs with “party favor” organza bags to keep the ants out since each fig has a slightly open “eye” at the end, a feature the ants call a “doorway”. Even bagged, we still split each fig open to check for the tiny ants before eating & this one was good! Interestingly, a fig isn’t really a fruit at all, but a hollow, fleshy stem with tiny flowers growing on the inside. The multitude of flowers aren’t visible until you split the fig open.

The maturing pomegranates are weighing the tree limbs down heavily. These fruits have (larger) organza bags to keep the birds from pecking them.

Another hardy desert crop is kale. Like chard, the kale plants survive winter cold and summer heat and feed us year around. On this hot August morning we picked some winterbor kale, “indigo rose” tomatoes (purple and red-orange skin), and a few jalapeno & ordono peppers as the basis for tonight’s dinner: kale pesto with tomatoes!

Farraday Newsome’s work on display at Santa Fe Clay while she conducted her one-week Summer Series workshop.

Emily Shiell, pouring vessel